Aknative's food.

Aknative
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Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 3:28 am
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Location: Fairbanks AK

Aknative's food.

Post by Aknative »

I guess maybe it might be interesting.

The family like's jerkey. Too expensive from the store, so we make our own. I like to use large muscle groups, like from the rump or the rump or the shoulder, certain parts on the flank, but sometimes this conflicts with where the good steaks are so we have to balance it out. Cut it with a jerkey board, just a board with a lip around the edges, taller on one side for thicker slices, shorter on the other for thinner slices. I like'm thicker. Cure them in a bucket in the fridge over night in a soak of La Choy soy sauce, brown sugar, garlic, pepper, all to taste. I don't really measure, do it to feel. Then after 12ish hours throw them in the dehydrator.
jerkey dehydrator.jpg
I like them dipped in seal oil with soy sauce. You get seal oil by rough skinning them with the blubber attached to the skin, then clean skinning the blubber from the skin. Should end up with a blanket of fat up to several inches thick depending on the seal. Cut it into strips, knick the strips at roughly one inch intervals with the ulu or man's knife, whatever the user's preference, so that they look like little cubes attached to each other in a string at the corners. Put them in a glass jar in a dark cool corner to render into liquid. The SE AK Natives render it with heat...I don't like SE seal oil, it's got an unpleasant taste that I think is from the heat rendering. Can be eaten as the solid fat before it's completely liquid. I like it with salt, or soy sauce. See a pattern? I should probably have blood work done for sodium and cholesterol.
jerkey in seal oil.jpg
Where I grew up everybody souped everything. Duck, moose, seal, fish, everything was souped. I still soup stuff occasionally. But I like to bake, fry, and grill as well.
salmon in a casserole dish.jpg
Frying moose in a pan. It needed garlic...and salt.
moose on the coleman.jpg
Moose brats over the fire! If we ad pork we like to boil them before grilling them or putting them on a stick. Same with bear brats.
moose brats on a stick.jpg
These turned out dry, next time we're either adding more pork or the animals own fat. And we need to find high temp cheese, the stuff we put in melted out before we could taste it.

We do still like soups. Use whatever base meat, and kielbasa sausage from the store for now until we learn to make it, vegetables of whatever sort we have, rice, potatoes, noodles, in whatever ratio we feel like at the time...and garlic salt.

We use moose tongue.
moosetongue.jpg
Beaver meat, moose/caribou meat that didn't make steaks or fall in the grinder, near everything makes good soup.
caribousoup.jpg
The soups taste best after a day of trapping at 20 below. Warms you up quicker too!
Rumors of my assimilation have been greatly exaggerated.

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JD
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Re: Aknative's food.

Post by JD »

I'm glad you started this thread. I think everyone will find it interesting. :rockon:
Psalm 55:7 - Lo, then would I wander far off, and remain in the wilderness.

Aknative
Posts: 499
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 3:28 am
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Location: Fairbanks AK

Re: Aknative's food.

Post by Aknative »

Try to bonless filet a pike. I've never been happy with the meat that goes with the Y bones, we're going to try a pickle with those strips. The bonless stuff we like to deep fry. My Southern/Northern bell of a wife experiments, rolling the meat in flour with whatever spices she's feeling and deep fries them.
cutting pike.jpg
fried fish.jpg
I'm partial to beer batter myself, gives me an excuse to crack a few open. I take some flower, add garlic salt to taste, pepper, add beer (for this a lighter cheaper beer, like Miller, or PBR, I don't wast good stouts or porters on this) until it's a consistency I like, similar to pancake batter, maybe thinner. It helps to dry the chunks and let them get near room temperature before dropping them in oil, at least in our little fry daddy. I guess it keeps from cooling the oil.

Dip in your favorite tartar sauce, wash down with what's left of the cheap beer used to make the batter!
Rumors of my assimilation have been greatly exaggerated.

Brian Boyer
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Re: Aknative's food.

Post by Brian Boyer »

Aknative wrote:Try to bonless filet a pike. I've never been happy with the meat that goes with the Y bones, we're going to try a pickle with those strips. The bonless stuff we like to deep fry. My Southern/Northern bell of a wife experiments, rolling the meat in flour with whatever spices she's feeling and deep fries them.
cutting pike.jpg
fried fish.jpg
I'm partial to beer batter myself, gives me an excuse to crack a few open. I take some flower, add garlic salt to taste, pepper, add beer (for this a lighter cheaper beer, like Miller, or PBR, I don't wast good stouts or porters on this) until it's a consistency I like, similar to pancake batter, maybe thinner. It helps to dry the chunks and let them get near room temperature before dropping them in oil, at least in our little fry daddy. I guess it keeps from cooling the oil.

Dip in your favorite tartar sauce, wash down with what's left of the cheap beer used to make the batter!

You may someday get tired of tasting the batter vs the fish, i have.. Dont get me wrong i love fried fish,.. But hell you can fry your toe and it would taste good.

I finally started experimemting and one of my favorite techniques i jokingly call "Jiffy Pop Popcorn Style",.. All you need is foil,.. And whatever you want your fish to simmer with in the campfire coals.

We play with differing ingredients, a little pat or two of butter being a common denominator no matter what we add to the mix. Two fillets on a sheet of foil, roll the foil over to make a pouch,.. Pinch all the three non fold edges tightly closed,.. Sling it in the campfire coals just at the edge of the coals.

The little pouch will soon "poof" puff up as the stream in the pouch inflates the assembly,.. Wait another 1/ maybe 2 minutes after it puffs out,.. Remove your meal.

This really lets you taste that delicious fish fillet so much the better,.. And your fish does seem to last longer too as its a richer taste,.. You cant pound down fillet after fillet like you canfried fish. Plus the kids get to "roll their own", they like it.

Jiffy Pop& Fried, really go well together.
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Aknative
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Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 3:28 am
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Location: Fairbanks AK

Re: Aknative's food.

Post by Aknative »

Cooked a lot of salmon and trout in foil on a fire growing up. It's good, and I do eat that way out on the river. At home, I like white flesh fish fried. Pike, halibut, and it turns out sheefish.

My wife makes a mean halibut Olympia, may try it with some of this stuff. It got mixed up, not sure what's what anymore. Might even simmer some in plain old butter, with a dusting of garlic salt.
Rumors of my assimilation have been greatly exaggerated.

sunshine
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Re: Aknative's food.

Post by sunshine »

I make a lot of jerky myself, usually deer but will use london broils when they go on sale once I run out of whole muscle meat.

I use Dale's Steak Seasoning, garlic powder, and Liquid Smoke usually but have experimented with more soy based or teriyaki based marinades.

You guys have a ton of berries up in AK, don't ya? I'll have to document my next batch of wine that I make. I do a fast wine (6-8 weeks until drinkable, aging it another month makes it even better) typically using raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries but it works just as well with any combination of the above or similar berries.

Croaker
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Re: Aknative's food.

Post by Croaker »

I've never been happy with the meat that goes with the Y bones, we're going to try a pickle with those strips.
Have you tried steaming the flesh with the y - bones? Steaming small fish with lots of bones is a common approach in Chinese cooking. Doesn't take very long and the cooked flesh will literally fall off the bones, ready to eat or use in a recipe.

If you make fish stock for Bouillabaisse or some other fish stew, the sections with the y - bones (along with that head / backbone of the Pike) would be great ingredients. Head and backbone make great crab bait too.

Aknative
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Location: Fairbanks AK

Re: Aknative's food.

Post by Aknative »

sunshine wrote:I make a lot of jerky myself, usually deer but will use london broils when they go on sale once I run out of whole muscle meat.

I use Dale's Steak Seasoning, garlic powder, and Liquid Smoke usually but have experimented with more soy based or teriyaki based marinades.

You guys have a ton of berries up in AK, don't ya? I'll have to document my next batch of wine that I make. I do a fast wine (6-8 weeks until drinkable, aging it another month makes it even better) typically using raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries but it works just as well with any combination of the above or similar berries.
After much adventure, Nazis, a heart rending shaman, Nazis again, a big rock, several plane crashes, boat crashes, rats, and snakes...why'd it have to be snakes...I found that great prize. That prize over which many wars have been fought...the Holy Grail...the homemade blueberry raspberry jam. It is heavenly.
raspberryblueberry jam.jpg
I'll be watching for that wine, and may have to pick more berries this year to accomodate!
Croaker wrote:
I've never been happy with the meat that goes with the Y bones, we're going to try a pickle with those strips.
Have you tried steaming the flesh with the y - bones? Steaming small fish with lots of bones is a common approach in Chinese cooking. Doesn't take very long and the cooked flesh will literally fall off the bones, ready to eat or use in a recipe.

If you make fish stock for Bouillabaisse or some other fish stew, the sections with the y - bones (along with that head / backbone of the Pike) would be great ingredients. Head and backbone make great crab bait too.
Picked alot of bones out of fish soup growing up. Gamalli (Grandma) would gut the fish, slit the big gut open lengthwise, scrape it out, rinse it off, and put if in the bot with the rest of the fish, from the head to the tail, cut into sections to fit in the pot. She'd put the roe in there as well, if she didn't eat it raw with salt before it fell in the pot.

With salmon and fish with similar bone structure, like Dolly Varden and trout, my dad would bake them and you could just about pick the flesh of the bones from the top side, then grab the head and carefully pull out the entire skeleton. Had to be cooked just right.

I can deal with salmon bones fine, but I'm just about tired of the shear number of fine y bones in the pike. I also worry about the 1 year old choking on them, so I'm trying to keep as bone free as possible. The cool thing about the pickled pike is that the bones should get soft and can be ate with the flesh. Here's hoping, I'll share how it turns out.
Rumors of my assimilation have been greatly exaggerated.

trapperles
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Re: Aknative's food.

Post by trapperles »

Pike or walleye all get fried the same for me...roll in flour, then battered egg, then salting cracker crumbs. I don't care for pike, but I've never had one done up boneless.

Aknative
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Location: Fairbanks AK

Re: Aknative's food.

Post by Aknative »

I'm not a fan of Ramen, Cup O'Noodles, etc, it just makes a convenient hot camp food. But throw a some roe from a big King salmon hen in there and it ain't bad! Simmer the eggs a bit, the more you cook them the smaller and harder they get, simmer to taste. Then throw your noodles in per the directions on the bag. Needed more eggs in this pot, the kids liked it too!
fisheggramen.jpg
Ever feel like you're being watched?
fishheadsoup.jpg
King head soup! Prepared in a plethora of manners. The collar was still attached to the head when it made it home, so I cut the collar off, split it in half along the spine, then cut those pieces in half. Cut the head in half from nose towards where the tail used to be. Put rice and potatoes in the bottom of the pot, followed by the fish parts and roe. Gamalli (Grandma) would keep the big gut, slit it open longways, scrape it out and rinse it, throw it in the pot. These guts ended up being gull food, but I loved the gut as a kid. May have to ad it again sometime. I like seasoning with salt and garlic salt, then some soy sauce after it's in my bowl. After it had simmered the 20 minutes to cook the rice and potatoes a bag of frozen vegetables was thrown in to help it cool. If it ain't bone, it's edible, slurp it right off! The cornea in the eye also ends up in the bone pile.
Rumors of my assimilation have been greatly exaggerated.

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