Chocolate covered centipedes

Longshot270
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Chocolate covered centipedes

Post by Longshot270 »

Well, my boss challenged me to make the creepiest dessert for a Halloween work party...

The spiders and ants didn't turn out so I got to thinking of something I was good at putting together with pretzels, gummy life savers and melted chocolate. I remembered all those bicycle, go kart and farm implement chains I put together and thought back to the time a 10 inch centipede crawled up my shower drain. It wasn't that colorful but it was nearly that long.

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It work so I used the rest of the bag of life savers

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The melted chocolate was a trick with the first batch getting overcooked in the microwave. Good thing I got a back up.

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Slapped them suckers onto a frozen plate to cool the chocolate before the lifesavers melted. Worked perfectly and formed a shell

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My big cutting board. By using the edges of the plates I have two of them actually rearing up like they are crawling out of a bowl.

SourMash
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Re: Chocolate covered centipedes

Post by SourMash »

By the name of the title, I was thinking...oh no he didn't. They turned out well, pretty slick idea!
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Willie Rip
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Re: Chocolate covered centipedes

Post by Willie Rip »

That's what I was thinking, Mash. I figured he must have been from some foreign country where they do that kind of thing.

Looks like a good treat.

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JD
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Re: Chocolate covered centipedes

Post by JD »

I think how we've been raised, and what we grew up eating has a lot to with which foods we like and which foods we consider unappetizing.
For example, horse meat is consumed down in Mexico and in some European countries. Probably nothing wrong with it, but most Americans have an aversion to consuming horse because we were not raised eating it.

I've seen trucks full of dogs in cages headed to Vietnam, and dog meat for sale at street markets in Asia. A local buddy said I didn't need to worry about being fed dog in the restaurants because it was more expensive than beef.

If you do much traveling in third world countries you'll run into all sorts of "exotic" fare.
One of my favorites is a spicy Northern Thai dish made with tiny river shrimp that are still alive and jump around in your mouth like pop rock candy.
I've also eaten water buffalo, snake, honey bees, deep fried grasshoppers, crickets, and silk worms. I don't care for the taste of crickets.

The Thai's have an interesting water bug in the rice fields they call mangda. The body of the bug looks like a gigantic roach, but the bug has large spiny front legs. The male mangda bug gives off aromatic pheromones that have a medicinal flowery odor. They are commonly served deep fried by street vendors.

My favorite Thai hot sauce is made with mangda mashed up in it. It's called Nam Phrik Mangda, and I'll never forget the first time I tasted it. Many years ago my wife served supper with a hot sauce that had an unusual smell and taste. I liked it so much I asked her what was in it. Her response was, "Mmm, hard to tell." I wanted to know, so I pressed her to go get her Thai/English dictionary and show me. She opened the book to a page displaying the water bug. After seeing the picture I just kept on eating. I don't know how something that ugly could taste that good, but I've been eating nam phrik mangda for over 20 years now and almost always have a jar of it in the fridge.

Here's a plate full of mangda we snacked on at a night market in Nakhon Phanom last year.
IMG_0085_800_600.JPG
Psalm 55:7 - Lo, then would I wander far off, and remain in the wilderness.

Longshot270
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Re: Chocolate covered centipedes

Post by Longshot270 »

I'd eat it, but then I also cooked some 14+ inch gizzard shad. Aside from the bones they were actually really good. The only thing is I'm not a fan of hot n' spicy. I like to taste my food. I'm a butter and garlic guy.

Aknative
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Re: Chocolate covered centipedes

Post by Aknative »

JD wrote:I think how we've been raised, and what we grew up eating has a lot to with which foods we like and which foods we consider unappetizing.
For example, horse meat is consumed down in Mexico and in some European countries. Probably nothing wrong with it, but most Americans have an aversion to consuming horse because we were not raised eating it.

I've seen trucks full of dogs in cages headed to Vietnam, and dog meat for sale at street markets in Asia. A local buddy said I didn't need to worry about being fed dog in the restaurants because it was more expensive than beef.

If you do much traveling in third world countries you'll run into all sorts of "exotic" fare.
One of my favorites is a spicy Northern Thai dish made with tiny river shrimp that are still alive and jump around in your mouth like pop rocks candy.
I've also eaten water buffalo, snake, honey bees, deep fried grasshoppers, crickets, and silk worms. I don't care for the taste of crickets.

The Thai's have an interesting water bug in the rice fields they call mangda. The body of the bug looks like a gigantic roach, but the bug has large spiny front legs. The male mangda bug gives off aromatic pheromones that have a medicinal flowery odor. They are commonly served deep fried by street vendors.

My favorite Thai hot sauce is made with mangda mashed up in it. It's called Nam Phrik Mangda, and I'll never forget the first time I tasted it. Many years ago my wife served supper with a hot sauce that had an unusual smell and taste. I liked it so much I asked her what was in it. Her response was, "Mmm, hard to tell." I wanted to know, so I pressed her to go get her Thai/English dictionary and show me. She opened the book to a page displaying the water bug. After seeing the picture I just kept on eating. I don't know how something that ugly could taste that good, but I've been eating nam phrik mangda for over 20 years now and almost always have a jar of it in the fridge.

Here's a plate full of mangda we snacked on at a night market in Nakhon Phanom last year.
IMG_0085_800_600.JPG
I've eaten fermented fish heads, various innards of various critters raw and cooked, but some of these dishes I'm not sure I could eat if I knew what I was eating.
Rumors of my assimilation have been greatly exaggerated.

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JD
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Re: Chocolate covered centipedes

Post by JD »

There are a lot of similarities between native Alaskan and Asian foods. Fermented fish sauce is used in cooking throughout Asia. I've also eaten many Thai and Lao dishes made with the intestines of chicken, fish, and pork. Make sense with the Asian continent being only about 50 miles across the Bering Strait from Alaska.

I remember asking you if you had ever eaten "stinkhead". I've heard the traditional way native Alaskans prepared the fermented fish head was to bury it in a hole lined with various grasses. No telling how many thousand years that preservation method goes back with your ancestors. I have read some of the newer generation, thinking modern technology was superior, veered away from those old tried and tested ways and attempted to use plastic containers for the fermentation process, resulting in numerous cases of botulism poisoning. Moral of the story...listen to your elders. :)
Psalm 55:7 - Lo, then would I wander far off, and remain in the wilderness.

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JD
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Re: Chocolate covered centipedes

Post by JD »

I've never had shad, but its an oily fish, so I think I would like it. Can't go wrong with butter and garlic Longshot. :thumbsup: The Ozark mountain hillbilly in me still loves my fried taters & onions smothered in butter and garlic.
Psalm 55:7 - Lo, then would I wander far off, and remain in the wilderness.

Aknative
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Re: Chocolate covered centipedes

Post by Aknative »

The stinkhead, tep'a in Yup'ik (pronounced almost just like it looks, the p is elongated like the double k in bookkeeper, that I enjoyed as a child were prepared in grass in a hole in the ground. Last batch I came near was in a plastic tub. I couldn't even be in the same room.

Pass the butter and garlic sauce! We'd pick clams, boil them till they open, dip them in melted butter or seal oil. You know, if they made it off the beach! Get hungry out there we were liable to pry a fresh clam open and slurp it out to fill the void.

Most everything was souped. Fish soup, duck soup, seal soup. Leaves the fat in the broth. Traditionally Alaska Natives needed a high fat high caloric diet to account for the calories burned subsisting at our cold temperatures in the winter and long busy days in the summer.

Today not so necessary, but man is it still hard to trim the fat off a moose leg!
Rumors of my assimilation have been greatly exaggerated.

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