The History of Mud Motors Around the World

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SPS Swamp Runner History

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Other Mud Motor History

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1932

Songsak Sriprasertying was born. This was the person who later created the most manufactured longtail mud motor around the world.

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1939-1945

World War II – The Germans used a small engine with a long tail type motor for small vessel transportation.

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1957

Songsak started manufacturing Thai longtails.

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1977, September 12th

Warren Coco created the Go-Devil business and began making mud motors.

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2000, June 30th

Mud Buddy Outdoors started their business.

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2002, April 9th

Prodrive started their business.

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2002, December 4th

Gator-Tail started their business.

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2009, January 8th

This is when we opened our doors at SPS North America. We became the only distributor in North America for SPS Thai longtail kits. These SPS kits were designed and made by Songsak Sriprasertying and are now made by his sons in Thailand.

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2010, April 27st

Backwater, Inc. started their business.

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2012

Mud Skipper Mud Motors started a business selling KKK Thai longtail kits. They now sell their kits under the initials of CKS.

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2013, April 1st

Beaver Dam Mud Runner started a business selling CLP Thai longtail kits.

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2014, March 26th

Boss Drives started their business.

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2014, July 25th

SPS losses its founder, Songsak Sriprasertying, who passed away on this date at the age of 82. During his lifetime, he produced more than 1-million longtail boat motors, making it an iconic symbol and cultural institution within Thailand today and with this achievement, Thai longtail boat motors can now be found on every continent.

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2014, December 3rd

PPF Mud Motors started their business.

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2019, August 25th

Two Swamp Runner powered boats become the first to ever document a full descent of the Yukon River by a motorized vessel.  Starting at the LLewellyn Glacier in British Columbia, the expedition traveled 2058 miles and arrived at the Bering Sea in just 24 days, 23hrs and 45 minutes, completing the fastest source-to-sea descent of the Yukon River ever recorded.

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